Meet the New $100 Bill
2013
Printer-friendly versionPDF version
a a
 
Type Size: Small
The Fiscal Times
October 8, 2013

It’s all about the Benjamins today.

For the first time in over a decade, the Federal Reserve began dispersing 3.5 billion new and improved $100 bills to banks across the country.

The brand new notes, complete with the old familiar face of American statesman and scientist Benjamin Franklin, incorporate new security features that make it nearly impossible to counterfeit, according to the central bank.

PHOTO GALLERY: THE $100 BILL THROUGH THE YEARS

The Fed has spent years working with the Secret Service and the Treasury Department to step up security on the C-notes, which U.S. officials say are likely the most counterfeited currency in the world.

The new features include a blue three-dimensional security ribbon with images of bells and 100s, and a color-changing bell in an inkwell.

RELATED: WHY YOUR $20 BILL COULD BE WORTH THOUSANDS

This will be in addition to security features on the previous designs including tiny text woven into Franklin’s collar as well as the text on the golden feather.

"The new design incorporates security features that make it easier to authenticate, but harder to replicate," said Federal Reserve Board Governor Jerome Powell in a statement.

Washington Correspondent Brianna Ehley, based in D.C., covers Congress, government agencies and spending issues, health care, and tax and economic policy for The Fiscal Times.