This Is the Best Time Since the Recession to Get a Small Business Loan

This Is the Best Time Since the Recession to Get a Small Business Loan

iStockphoto
By Millie Dent

Feeling the entrepreneurial itch? This is the best time in years to start a small business with a loan from a big bank, according to a new report from online loan marketplace Biz2Credit.

Banks with $10 billion or more in assets have raised their approval rates for small business loan requests to the highest level since 2011, when Biz2Credit started tracking them. In June 2011 big banks granted a measly 8.9 percent of small loan applications. Last month they approved 22.19 percent.

“These are the best numbers for big bank lending since the recession," Biz2Credit CEO Rohit Arora said in the report. 

Related: What the U.S. Must Do to Avoid Another Financial Crisis

Banks had pulled back sharply on small business lending during and after the financial crisis. As a result, startups began turning to alternative lenders and credit unions. Those other sources of funding now have approval rates of 61 percent and 43 percent respectively, but those rates have been steadily declining, making the rebound in bank loans all the more welcome.

Bank approval rates are still well below where they were before the recession — and the Biz2Credit report is based on an analysis of just 1,000 loan applications on the site — but the trend is an encouraging one for the entrepreneurs among us.

Chart of the Day: Trump's Huge Proposed Cuts to Public Investment

Trump budget arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington
KEVIN LAMARQUE/Reuters
By The Fiscal Times Staff

Ben Ritz of the Progressive Policy Institute slams President Trump’s new budget:

“It would dismantle public investments that lay the foundation for economic growth, resulting in less innovation. It would shred the social safety net, resulting in more poverty. It would rip away access to affordable health care, resulting in more disease. It would cut taxes for the rich, resulting in more income inequality. It would bloat the defense budget, resulting in more wasteful spending. And all this would add up to a higher national debt than the policies in President Obama’s final budget proposal.”

Here’s Ritz’s breakdown of Trump’s proposed spending cuts to public investment in areas such as infrastructure, education and scientific research:

Chart of the Day: The Decline in Corporate Taxes

By The Fiscal Times Staff

Since roughly the end of World War Two, individual income taxes in the U.S. have equaled about 8 percent of GDP. By contrast, the Tax Policy Center says, “corporate income tax revenues declined from 6% of GDP in 1950s to under 2% in the 1980s through the Great Recession, and have averaged 1.4% of GDP since then.”

Tax Refunds Rebound

Flickr / Chris Potter
By The Fiscal Times Staff

Smaller refunds in the first few weeks of the current tax season were shaping up to be a political problem for Republicans, but new data from the IRS shows that the value of refund checks has snapped back and is now running 1.3 percent higher than last year. The average refund through February 23 last year was $3,103, while the average refund through February 22 of 2019 was $3,143 – a difference of $40. The chart below from J.P. Morgan shows how refunds performed over the last 3 years. 

Number of the Day: $22 Trillion

iStockphoto/The Fiscal Times
By The Fiscal Times Staff

The total national debt surpassed $22 trillion on Monday. Total public debt outstanding reached $22,012,840,891,685.32, to be exact. That figure is up by more than $1.3 trillion over the past 12 months and by more than $2 trillion since President Trump took office.