Obamacare: How Federal and State Exchanges Stack Up
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The Fiscal Times
November 14, 2013

The Obama administration released long-awaited numbers on the rocky HealthCare.gov rollout Wednesday, announcing that 106,185 people had picked an insurance plan in the first month since the federal and state exchanges launched – well below the nearly 500,000 officials had projected would sign up over that period.

The new data show that the state-run exchanges have been significantly more successful than the troubled federal marketplace. The exchanges for 14 states and the District of Columbia have accounted for 79,391 of the new enrollees, or about three quarters of the total. In all, just under 10 percent of people who have been determined to be eligible to enroll in an Obamacare plan have actually chosen a plan, including 21 percent of eligible consumers going through the state-based marketplaces and 4 percent of those using the federal exchange.

Related: Disappointing Numbers Keep Sebelius on the Hook

The state-by-state signups vary dramatically. California, the state with the largest population of uninsured, saw more than 35,000 individuals select an insurance plan, by far the most of any state – and thousands more than the federal exchange covering 36 other states. In North Dakota, by contrast, just 42 people signed up through the federal exchange, and just 58 people signed up in South Dakota.

Enrollments in the California exchange plans have accelerated since the beginning of November, state officials announced Wednesday in releasing numbers that cover a broader time period than those released by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In the first 12 days of November, 29,000 people enrolled in insurance plans offered through the state marketplace, called Covered California. That’s about double the signup rate for October, when about a thousand people a day signed up.

“The numbers are better than encouraging. They show momentum and very high consumer interest,” Covered California Executive Director Peter V. Lee said. “As anticipated, consumers spent October comparing plans and educating themselves about their health care options, including financial assistance options.”  In total, the state says nearly 60,000 people have enrolled in insurance plans since Oct. 1.

Here are the state and federal numbers released by the Department of Health and Human Services. The full HHS release is available here.

Total Marketplace Applications, Eligibility Determinations, and  Marketplace Plan Selections By Marketplace Type and State (1) 10-1-2013 to 11-2-2013 
 
Number of Individuals Determined Eligible to Enroll in a Marketplace Plan 
 
State Name Total Number of Completed Applications (2) Total Individuals Applying for Coverage in Completed Applications (3) Total Eligible to Enroll in a Marketplace Plan (4)Eligible to Enroll in a Marketplace Plan with Financial Assistance (5)Determined or Assessed Eligible for Medicaid / CHIP by the Marketplace (6) Pending/ Other (7) Number of Individuals Who Have Selected a Marketplace Plan (8)  
States Implementing Their Own Marketplaces (SBMs)
California (9) 
105,782
192,489
93,663
N/A 
79,519
19,307
35,364
Colorado (10) 
20,492
45,575
36,335
8,742
N/A 
9,240
3,736
Connecticut 
12,337
18,815
12,325
6,807
6,490
0
4,418
District Of Columbia (11) 
2,541
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A
Hawaii (12) 
1,754
2,379
1,156
N/A 
N/A 
1,223
N/A
Kentucky 
50,279
76,294
39,207
13,201
28,676
8,411
5,586
Maryland 
10,917
N/A 
3,498
2,638
5,923
N/A 
1,284
Massachusetts (13) 
14,413
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A
Minnesota (14) 
15,268
31,447
21,532
6,759
9,166
749
1,774
Nevada 
9,186
14,819
N/A 
N/A 
5,710
9,109
1,217
New York 
N/A 
N/A 
134,897
34,267
23,902
N/A 
16,404
Oregon (15) 
8,752
N/A 
190
N/A 
425
N/A 
N/A
Rhode Island 
6,670
9,581
3,326
2,086
3,447
2,808
1,192
Vermont 
3,242
5,540
3,341
1,078
1,411
788
1,325
Washington (16) 
64,990
119,309
29,503
13,375
48,196
41,610
7,091
 SBM Subtotal 
326,623
516,248
378,973
88,953
212,865
93,245
79,391
States With Marketplaces that are Supported by or Fully-Run by HHS (FFM)
Idaho (17) 4,75310,5737,7333,3051,5971,243338
New Mexico (17,18) 4,0557,5294,2491,5493,552N/A 172
Alabama 10,57320,84014,6964,9102,2623,882624
Alaska 1,2532,2031,60659836822953
Arizona 17,22032,89720,7417,15611,339817739
Arkansas 7,29414,0596,1232,2797,430506250
Delaware 1,8973,4912,2046741,2008797
Florida 67,366123,87093,45629,63712,88717,5273,571
Georgia 28,64256,78341,42612,7577,7097,6481,390
Illinois 30,90156,63635,80211,60319,4471,3871,370
Indiana 15,98231,97919,0937,89011,3051,581701
Iowa 5,54710,8846,1042,0794,490290136
Kansas 6,06112,2059,0873,0091,7181,400371
Louisiana 7,70214,16310,2943,2771,4602,409387
Maine 3,5506,4975,0612,116623813271
Michigan 23,98744,02534,19712,4684,9784,8501,329
Mississippi 4,3398,2045,8221,6629251,457148
Missouri 14,13127,91120,1217,1114,1573,633751
Montana 2,6835,2053,8151,711457933212
Nebraska 4,9479,9737,4532,9672,295225338
New Hampshire 4,0067,8175,7672,0161,643407269
New Jersey 23,02142,37223,9858,08217,460927741
North Carolina 29,54757,65342,11015,0517,4048,1391,662
North Dakota 9691,8451,1803705858042
Ohio 24,05045,12834,37411,8667,5353,2191,150
Oklahoma 6,90514,1699,9521,4322,4121,805346
Pennsylvania 31,82757,67443,96615,4973,7889,9202,207
South Carolina 11,24920,98015,2574,9733,1122,611572
South Dakota 1,4913,0812,27982252527758
Tennessee 17,59833,23024,3348,5734,0894,807992
Texas 53,904108,41080,96025,52011,68215,7682,991
Utah 6,18614,5809,3183,8834,816446357
Virginia 21,66742,34132,5349,3334,0885,7191,023
West Virginia 3,8077,0963,4421,2683,103551174
Wisconsin 19,09834,67822,0388,91110,7361,904877
Wyoming 1,3532,6542,04082221939585
 FFM Subtotal 519,561993,635702,619237,177183,396107,89226,794
MARKETPLACE TOTAL, All States 846,1841,509,8831,081,592326,130396,261201,137106,185

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Executive Editor Yuval Rosenberg oversees coverage of business, the economy, technology and Wall Street. A former web editor at WNYC, Fortune and Newsweek, he also writes on a wide range of subjects.