Bartlett's Notations
Focus on Tax Policy
Friday, March 25, 2011 - 5:30am
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On March 23, the Treasury Department criticized a Republican proposal to allow multinational corporations to repatriate foreign earnings tax-free.

In a March 21 commentary, Scott Hodge of the Tax Foundation posted data from the OECD showing that the U.S. has the most progressive tax system among member countries.

On March 21, the Center for American Progress published a study on spending through the tax code.

On March 17, the Joint Committee on Taxation published an estimate of the budgetary effects of the president’s tax proposals.

The Spring issue of the journal Democracy was published on March 16, containing a number of articles on tax policy.

On March 14, the Internal Revenue Service released the 2010 edition of its annual data book.

Also on March 14, University of Kent economist Christopher Heady posted a commentary reviewing the international experience with taxes on economic growth.

And on March 14, the Joint Committee on Taxation published a report reviewing tax legislation enacted in the 111th Congress.

On March 11, the International Monetary Fund published a working paper analyzing a financial transactions tax.

Also on March 11, the European Union published a paper examining the role of housing tax provisions in the financial crisis.

A March 3 paper by University of Hannover economists Holger Strulik and Timo Trimborn concludes that federal revenue would increase if the capital gains tax was abolished.

I last posted items on this topic on March 10.

Bruce Bartlett is an American historian and columnist who focuses on the intersection between politics and economics. He blogs daily and writes a weekly column at The Fiscal Times. Bartlett has written for Forbes Magazine and Creators Syndicate, and his work is informed by many years in government, including as a senior policy analyst in the Reagan White House. He is the author of seven books including the New York Times best-seller, Imposter: How George W. Bush Bankrupted America and Betrayed the Reagan Legacy (Doubleday, 2006). 

Bruce Bartlett’s columns focus on the intersection of politics and economics. The author of seven books, he worked in government for many years and was senior policy analyst in the Reagan White House.